Can wikis stand alone?

Anne Gentle asks, “Can wikis for documentation stand alone or do they need to be supplemented?”

Some of her points are these…

Top Reasons Why Wikis Will Increase in Popularity

I’m not an expert on wikis, but so far this is what I’ve noticed using the SharePoint 2007 wiki:

  1. Wikis are fast. This is literally what wiki means in Hawaiian. I think I can complete a documentation project in two-thirds the time using a wiki instead of a traditional help authoring tool.
  2. Wikis change the perception of help. Let’s face it: online help has a bad reputation of being useless. Wikis provide a new format that can counter that perception and empower critics with the responsibility to act on their jabs.
  3. Wikis draw upon collective intelligence. Even if you only have a handful of contributors to the wiki, drawing upon collective intelligence from actual product users is invaluable. Just getting one edit can expand the usefulness of your documentation tenfold.
  4. Wikis are convenient. With wikis, you don’t need to attach files to emails, compile an online help file, transfer folders to a shared server, decipher edits on paper, or try to interpret Word’s track changes. Editing of the files by SMEs and editors is a cinch.
  5. Wikis give the impression of being up to date. Even if they aren’t, wikis have more life. You can update them on the fly. One minor update to a page can renew the user’s faith that the documentation is current.
  6. Wikis have tremendous potential in the enterprise. Think about all the documents that project members collaborate on in the enterprise. Wikis will make project teams much more efficient (and fun).
  7. Wikis are a curiosity that merits experimentation. Everyone I meet is curious about wikis. They look at them with a new-found wonder. That’s worth something.

2 Responses to “Can wikis stand alone?”

  1. Milan Davidovic Says:

    I’m looking around for manufacturers in regulated industries (medical devices, aerospace, stuff like that) with wikis for their own products. Haven’t found anything yet — could be that the regulatory environment puts a chill on this sort of information experimentation…

  2. monado Says:

    I imagine that regulated industries would not publish wikis–too uncontrolled–but they might use them internally.


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