Mother and child reunion

This stone-age burial in the Sahara desert is a mother and two children, who seem to have been buried holding each others’ hands. Two civilizations have been found from 10,000 years ago up to 5,000 years ago, during the time of the “green Sahara,” with an arid gap between them.

Stone-age burial on a bed of flowers

Stone-age burial on a bed of flowers

National Geographic’s Explorer at Large Paul Serano was one of the discoverers and is a principal author of this paper: “Lakeside Cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 Years of Holocene Population and Environmental Change“:

Background

Approximately two hundred human burials were discovered on the edge of a paleolake in Niger that provide a uniquely preserved record of human occupation in the Sahara during the Holocene (~8000 B.C.E. to the present). Called Gobero, this suite of closely spaced sites chronicles the rapid pace of biosocial change in the southern Sahara in response to severe climatic fluctuation.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Two main occupational phases are identified that correspond with humid intervals in the early and mid-Holocene, based on 78 direct AMS radiocarbon dates on human remains, fauna and artifacts, as well as 9 OSL dates on paleodune sand. The older occupants have craniofacial dimensions that demonstrate similarities with mid-Holocene occupants of the southern Sahara and Late Pleistocene to early Holocene inhabitants of the Maghreb. Their hyperflexed burials compose the earliest cemetery in the Sahara dating to ~7500 B.C.E. These early occupants abandon the area under arid conditions and, when humid conditions return ~4600 B.C.E., are replaced by a more gracile people with elaborated grave goods including animal bone and ivory ornaments.

Conclusions/Significance

The principal significance of Gobero lies in its extraordinary human, faunal, and archaeological record, from which we conclude the following:

  1. The early Holocene occupants at Gobero (7700–6200 B.C.E.) were largely sedentary hunter-fisher-gatherers with lakeside funerary sites that include the earliest recorded cemetery in the Sahara.
  2. Principal components analysis of craniometric variables closely allies the early Holocene occupants at Gobero with a skeletally robust, trans-Saharan assemblage of Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene human populations from the Maghreb and southern Sahara.
  3. Gobero was abandoned during a period of severe aridification possibly as long as one millennium (6200–5200 B.C.E).
  4. More gracile humans arrived in the mid-Holocene (5200–2500 B.C.E.) employing a diversified subsistence economy based on clams, fish, and savanna vertebrates as well as some cattle husbandry.
  5. Population replacement after a harsh arid hiatus is the most likely explanation for the occupational sequence at Gobero.
  6. We are just beginning to understand the anatomical and cultural diversity that existed within the Sahara during the Holocene.

Citation: Sereno PC, Garcea EAA, Jousse H, Stojanowski CM, Saliège J-F, et al. (2008) Lakeside Cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 Years of Holocene Population and Environmental Change. PLoS ONE 3(8): e2995. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002995

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Can wikis stand alone?

Anne Gentle asks, “Can wikis for documentation stand alone or do they need to be supplemented?”

Some of her points are these…

Top Reasons Why Wikis Will Increase in Popularity

I’m not an expert on wikis, but so far this is what I’ve noticed using the SharePoint 2007 wiki:

  1. Wikis are fast. This is literally what wiki means in Hawaiian. I think I can complete a documentation project in two-thirds the time using a wiki instead of a traditional help authoring tool.
  2. Wikis change the perception of help. Let’s face it: online help has a bad reputation of being useless. Wikis provide a new format that can counter that perception and empower critics with the responsibility to act on their jabs.
  3. Wikis draw upon collective intelligence. Even if you only have a handful of contributors to the wiki, drawing upon collective intelligence from actual product users is invaluable. Just getting one edit can expand the usefulness of your documentation tenfold.
  4. Wikis are convenient. With wikis, you don’t need to attach files to emails, compile an online help file, transfer folders to a shared server, decipher edits on paper, or try to interpret Word’s track changes. Editing of the files by SMEs and editors is a cinch.
  5. Wikis give the impression of being up to date. Even if they aren’t, wikis have more life. You can update them on the fly. One minor update to a page can renew the user’s faith that the documentation is current.
  6. Wikis have tremendous potential in the enterprise. Think about all the documents that project members collaborate on in the enterprise. Wikis will make project teams much more efficient (and fun).
  7. Wikis are a curiosity that merits experimentation. Everyone I meet is curious about wikis. They look at them with a new-found wonder. That’s worth something.

How’d you like this pocket protector?

Speaking of Geek Heaven….

cat
more funny pictures

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